Juvenile Martial Eagle Left Behind

(Video) In the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park we observed a adult Martial Eagle leaving its nest while the juvenile aagle ate its lunch after calling its parent intensively.

In the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park we observed an adult Martial Eagle leaving its nest while the juvenile Martial Eagle ate its lunch after calling its parent intensively.

Short Facts about the Martial Eagle

Habitat

Sub-Saharan Africa, with a reasonable possibility to spot them in protected areas such as Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park (where we took this video) or Kruger National Park, South Africa and Etosha National Park, Namibia.

Size

This is the largest eagle in Africa which wingspan can get over 2.5 meters and weight can be  slightly over six kilograms.

Diet

The martial eagle is one of the world’s most powerful raptors. Their diet consists mainly of birds like francolins, guineafowl, bustards, young ostriches, storks, herons, other waterfowl, hornbills and queleas. Other than that they also like to feed  on reptiles like  lizards and snakes and mammals like hares, hyraxes (dassies), mongooses, squirrels, rats, genets, foxes, monkeys, young warthogs and small antelopes and just about anything that moves.

Reproduction

The mating season is mainly between November and April. Martial Eagles build their nests in large trees, sometimes up to twenty meters off the ground with sticks. With usually only one egg every two years the reproduction rate is very slow. This is due to the juvenile birds remaining dependent of their parents for a relatively long period of six to twelve months.

Conservation

The low reproductive rate and its need of large territories make the martial eagle vulnerable in a world where there are not much wild spaces left.  Their numbers are severely declining because of shooting and poisoning by farmers, as the raptors are wrongly thought to be a major predatory threat to livestock. Collisions with power-lines and steep sided water reservoirs where many birds drown, are further reasons that their numbers are dwindling.

Additional protected areas must be developed and programs to educate farmers set in place to preserve the Martial Eagle and other endangered species.

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Cheetahs Threatened With Extinction

One of my favorite wild cats is undoubtedly the graceful cheetah. Unfortunately a new survey shows that the numbers of Cheetahs in the wild are declining much more rapidly than previously estimated.

We met a few cheetah mams with their cubs on the South African side of the Kgalagadi Frontier Park.

Can this unfortunate development be reversed in time?

Visiting the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in South Africa we encountered the graceful fastest land animal on Earth, the Cheetah. Being at the rim of extinction its a rare experience to see cheetahs in the wild.

Over the last hundred years their numbers dropped from hundred thousand to merely only  7,100 adult cheetahs remaining in the wild as they lost more than ninety percent of there natural habitat to human populations.

Is that unfortunate development reversible? Continue reading “Cheetahs Threatened With Extinction”

Skeleton In The Closet Of England

Traveling the World as Grey World Nomads we are looking for the beauty of countries and their wildlife. But sometimes we stumble over dreadful truths of environmental issues which leave us flabbergasted and deeply shocked. We write also about these unpleasant facts as they may affect us and our kids sooner or later.

Traveling through one of the most gorgeous of England’s countrysides of the Lake District we reached the lovely west-coast holiday village at Saint Bees. Unfortunately only a couple of days into our stay we stumbled over a skeleton in the closet of England, hidden just around the corner. We were sleeping next to worlds worst nuclear dumpsite – Sellafield United Kingdom.

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Peaceful landscape at the west-coast of England with a scary secret

Continue reading “Skeleton In The Closet Of England”

A Golden Eagle Having To Bear A Heavy Lot With A Good Cause – Loch Lomond Bird Of Prey Centre

Orla, the Golden Eagle, a majestic raptor in the Bird of Prey Centre in Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park in Balloch, Scotland. Thoughts about birds of prey in captivity.

Eager to take off, the Golden Eagle flaps her imposing wings of about two meter wingspan as she spots another bird which appears only as a tiny speck in the sky to the humans limited-sight. But her attempts are futile as the rigid ties keep her firmly to the ground. She has to bear a heavy lot for a good cause and will most probably stay for ever on the grounds of  Loch Lomond Bird Of Prey Centre. Continue reading “A Golden Eagle Having To Bear A Heavy Lot With A Good Cause – Loch Lomond Bird Of Prey Centre”